Esther Wojcicki – How to Raise Successful People


The godmother of Silicon Valley, legendary teacher, and mother of a super family shares her tried-and-tested methods for raising happy, healthy, successful children using trust, respect, independence, collaboration, and kindness: TRICK.

Esther Wojcicki – “Woj” to her many friends and admirers – is famous for three things: teaching a high school class that has changed the lives of thousands of kids, inspiring Silicon Valley legends like Steve Jobs, and raising three daughters who have each become famously successful. What do these three accomplishments have in common? They’re the result of TRICK, Woj’s secret to raising successful people: trust, respect, independence, collaboration, and kindness. Simple lessons, but the results are radical.

Wojcicki’s methods are the opposite of helicopter parenting. As we face an epidemic of parental anxiety, Woj is here to say: relax. Talk to infants as if they are adults. Allow teenagers to pick projects that relate to the real world and their own passions, and let them figure out how to complete them. Above all, let your child lead.

How to Raise Successful People offers essential lessons for raising, educating, and managing people to their highest potential. Change your parenting, change the world.

Author: Esther Wojcicki
Narrator: Andrea Gallo
Duration: 10 hours 51 minutes
Released: 19 Jul 2005
Publisher: Recorded Books
Language: English

User Review:

maze hairy

I expected more from this book but basically this feels like a book from a good mother whos girls had every advantage in the world, though the writer skips that. It feels braggadocio, the writer talks a lot about her accomplishments as a teacher who helps poor kids and created this and that, never saying well my kids are now rich, and famous which helped me created these programs with google, etc. This could have been a good book, but you will not get a real understanding of how her daughters became so successful, only how great mom is. Esther should have taken more time with this book, hired a ghostwriter and really gone deep. Instead, it feels rushed only to make a dime.